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I am looking for software that will monitor a specific folder and when a file is created in it send that file off via ftp to a client associated with that folder by the software.

I have tried software such as smart FTP and cute FTP and they don't seem to monitor folders very consistently. Some of the options with them were to write scripts to delete duplicated files from the transfer queue. I really don't want to have to write scripts for software I purchase. I am not opposed to needing scripting or writing it but I feel I shouldn't have to write scripting to make there software properly do some thing it says it does out of the box.

I am currently trying to do this on a Windows XP box though running on a Server 2003 is an option if it would make things easier.

I really just want pointed in the correct direction this is all fairly foreign to me

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you aren't opposed to paying for the software, look into WatchDirectory. It should do what you are wanting, and it runs on Windows. It has a 30-day trial, so you can make it works for you before dropping $79 for it.

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I what bothers you is to write scripts for software you purchase, but you don't hate the idea of writing system scripts, you could copy/paste a few lines of Windows' VBS using WMI events to monitor the folder and then execute an ftp command line. This kind of script can then be run on startup and will keep running forever in the background.

All of it free of charges (besides the OS ;-))

See this link for a start.

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Eventghost could possibly do that

It can monitor folders and then when something happens do something else. All scriptable.

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If you go to the "Java Tutorial" on Oracles website, there is lots of example code of how to write your own 100-line Java program to watch a directory (using JDK 1.7) . You don't need shareware to do it.

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