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I am running Windows Server 2008 and frequently there is a single process that spikes the CPU usage to 25% or more and causes a lot of slow down issues. The server is being used remotely by approx 30 users and if I don't spot this problem quick enough it gets very frustrating for them when working.

Is there a way to automatically monitor and report if this process becomes over active and causes problems? The actual process is an exe file that runs as part of a Web Application for PDA remote users.

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You can use Windows Performance Monitor to monitor the CPU usage on the server. You can then configure an alert for when it reaches a certain threshold. This article gives a good description of setting this up.

The Alert will let you either log this to the event log, send a netsend message, or more useful, run a program. You can then configure this to run a script or batch file that will send an email, or pager, or your favourite notification method.

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25% isn't a lot. Assuming that meter goes to 100% then for every 4 seconds of wall time, your cpu is idle for 3 of them.

I would look more deeply into the main processes on that machine, I would suspect there is contention for a resource other than CPU, most likely disk IO, or network bandwidth, possibly even resources from another machine that service that process.

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use this tool from microsoft which give u all the Assessment Solution Accelerator

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=67240b76-3148-4e49-943d-4d9ea7f77730&DisplayLang=en

with above tool use a WMI so it dont use much or u r HW and network

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