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If I ping one of my servers from another server, is there any log or anything, a way to 'see' the ping from the other server on the target machine and identify it's source IP or something?

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Set up Wireshark on a PC and watch for the packets to come in there. NetMon is also an option on the server but I prefer to leave this type of analysis off the server.

If there is a gateway (firewall, router, etc) between your servers the ping should / could be logged at that device also depending on the log configuration of that device.

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It'll probably be logged as "ICMP type 8, echo request" –  Satanicpuppy Mar 11 '11 at 14:50
    
@Satanicpuppy Thanks for that :) –  squillman Mar 11 '11 at 14:50
    
NP. ;) –  Satanicpuppy Mar 11 '11 at 14:52
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Yes wireshark is the way to go...also use this process to actually strip out the traffic from the ip address that is pinging the server:

1) Fire up wireshark
2) Select the correct interface
3) Use the filter 'ip.src==192.168.2.1'

NOTE: you can use 'http and ip.src==192.168.2.1' to drill down into the protocol

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+1 for the process! –  squillman Mar 11 '11 at 15:02
    
Perhaps you meant icmp and ip.src==192.168.2.1? "Ping" is typically associated with ICMP echoes and replies. –  Gerald Combs Oct 8 '12 at 23:59
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If we are talking about a Linux Server, the simplest thing you can do is:

# tcpdump -i eth0 '(icmp)' -nn -vv

Considering that "eth0" is the interface from where the "ping packet" (icmp type 8) will come in.

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Given the Windows-server-2003 tag, probably not talking about Linux server, no... –  HopelessN00b Oct 8 '12 at 23:43
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