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I am running analysis over many live TV channels (both broadcast and cable networks). Currently I have an office setup with couple of DISH receivers hooked up to HDMI capture cards in a machine that's doing processing in software. To expand to dozens of channels, I'll need to host this somewhere so I would like to set it up in a colo. I'm not sure if this is a common requirement as I can't seem to find many places that advertise TV reception as part of their services. Any pointers would be appreciated.

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Update: I found one place which seems to explicitly offer this: ccr.net/services/tv_radio_content_capture/default.htm –  Karthik Mar 14 '11 at 21:13
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If you don't mind sharing what are you analyzing? that sounds kinda neat –  Jacob Mar 14 '11 at 21:20
    
@Jacob: Doing fingerprinting and image processing on live television to build a valuable data set! –  Karthik Jun 29 '11 at 23:02

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I was very close to doing a similar thing with $dayjob.

Most colocation centres - good ones, anyway, do rent roof-space, although these are usually used for satellite backhaul. I can't see why they'd mind putting TV satellite receiving dishes on their aerial space, provided that you're paying for it ;)

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Hi Tom, would you happen to know if certain data centers offer television feeds with lower delay? Satellite feeds usually have higher delays than cable, etc. But ideally for our application we could have hosting in a space that delivers a TV feed that is ahead of national broadcast -- any idea where I would start looking for this? –  Karthik Jun 29 '11 at 23:01
    
Delivering TV ahead of national broadcast... You're either gonna break the laws of physics, or the terms of the original media owner whose data you're broadcasting. Generally, just pick somewhere with a big internet exchange near by, lots of PoPs for carriers, then get a low-latency connection. –  Tom O'Connor Jun 29 '11 at 23:05

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