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This is just a minor nitpic, but I wonder if anyone can tell me the reason - when I restart apache, these lines get written into /var/log/apache2/error.log

[Thu Mar 24 10:20:56 2011] [warn] mod_wsgi: Compiled for Python/2.6.5.
[Thu Mar 24 10:20:56 2011] [warn] mod_wsgi: Runtime using Python/2.6.6.
[Thu Mar 24 10:20:56 2011] [notice] Apache/2.2.16 (Ubuntu) mod_wsgi/3.2 Python/2.6.6 configured -- resuming normal operations

How do I resolve this? Should I?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The mod_wsgi warnings are notifying you of a potential dependency problem. While it is unlikely to be an issue (it is not common for there to be significant API differences between a x.y.z release and x.y.z+1) it does not know this for sure so warns you that there is a potential issue. The only way to sort this is to recompile the module against the newer version, and if you are using the standard packages you will need to wait for the package maintainers to do this. If you have compile Apache (or just that module) yourself, then you can do the recompile (you could also even if you are using the distro's standard packages, but I'd not recommend this for such a small issue).

The "apache has started" notice has been going into the error logs for quite some time IIRC. In many environments a restart is a problem that could cause downtime, so it is probably valid to be there as a "notice" level message for automated log scanners to pick up and report on if it happens outside of a planned maintenance window.

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There is two types of logs in Apache : error and access logs. A service start is not an access, so I think they put the log in error log. In addition, it is an valuable information for the administrator to know that the service is starting (or retstarting) correctly.

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I see. So it's just a matter of semantics. –  ripper234 Mar 24 '11 at 10:38

The official mod_wsgi documentation explains this exact issue. See:

http://code.google.com/p/modwsgi/wiki/InstallationIssues#Python_Patch_Level_Mismatch

In short, fine if your Python was installed with a shared library and mod_wsgi is using it and potentially bad if your Python was installed with only a static library and mod_wsgi has that hard linked into itself.

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