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Just got a good VPS deal with Dual Virtual Core/CentOS/150G/1gb ram/2 IPs. But cPanel is out of my reach. As such I am new to VPS with good knowledge of cPanel shared hosting. Was using RH few years back and am using and comfortable with LAMP on Ubuntu at present. I have time and taste to learn Unix from server end.

My Questions are:

  1. I will be hosting around 10 Drupal sites with reasonable amount of traffic. Will the above specs be sufficient?
  2. My Host can install any free panel like Kloxo, VHCS etc. First of all, do I really need a panel to manage VPS? If I can manage without a control panel, what do I need to know? Can I accomplish it over period by first using CentOS on my local machine?

Any link to primer/tutorial OR a brief book to jump start is welcome.

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consider selecting an accepted answer –  AbiusX Mar 28 '11 at 18:36
    
"10 Drupal sites with reasonable amount of traffic" with 1 GB RAM?!? You can't be serious. –  HTTP500 Sep 21 '11 at 23:08
    
@HTTP500 what's a "reasonable amount of traffic". That's a very subjective term. –  Drew Khoury Apr 30 '13 at 13:26
    
@HTTP500 1GB RAM can hold a lot of stuff. –  Cobra_Fast Apr 30 '13 at 13:50
    
Please let us know if we've answered your question in enough detail and clarity or if you need something further. If you've got a correct answer you can click the tick to let everyone know which answer suits you best. –  Drew Khoury May 5 '13 at 3:37

4 Answers 4

Do I really need a panel to manage VPS?

Nope, all you need is a shell prompt.

What do I need to know?

I'd start by learning how to configure Apache, particularly vhosts.

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You could live without a panel, but its a huge pain. You need to almost know everything about a CentOS box and of course about servers.

The major problem would be security, of course since you can't know much security.

BTW if you're intending to have only ten sites, you can live without a panel, just setup a LAMP, CSF (firewall), learn some httpd.conf (apache configuration) and MySQL configuration (mostly for separation of user access)

Keep in mind that most of the time a panel is needed by customers since they don't know much about tech (usually) but if you're setting up the sites yourself, its ok.

Free control panels (like Kloxo) are not trustworthy. Kloxo developer performed suicide cuz his software ruined many servers when a huge security bug was found.

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Thank you Abius –  Moonglade Mar 28 '11 at 7:45
    
It's only a huge pain until you learn your way around. Once you've learned, you're more secure and faster without a panel. A big -1 for the scaremongering about free panels. There can be big security bugs in non-free panels, too, and you're less likely to be able to find them. –  ceejayoz Sep 21 '11 at 21:09
    
Well ceejayoz, you should know that you're not the only one using the panel, but your hosting users are :) they can't be more fast and secure without one. –  AbiusX Oct 10 '11 at 20:01

I will be hosting around 10 Drupal sites with reasonable amount of traffic. Will the above specs be sufficient?

You can install and run 10 drupal sites easily on "VPS w/ Dual Virtual Core/CentOS/150G/1gb ram/2 IP".

Of course get enough traffic and you'll outgrow any server. You'll need to be doing more than hundreds of simultaneous connection to max out what a server of that spec can handle (of course this is highly dependant on your final setup...something like SSL will require more CPU power, load your site up with inefficient PHP scripts and they will chew your RAM etc)

My Host can install any free panel like Kloxo, VHCS etc. First of all, do I really need a panel to manage VPS?

Do you need a panel? No, there's no "need" but you might find it makes life easier. You might find dealing with a control panel makes things harder! Only you can answer that question.

If I can manage without a control panel, what do I need to know? Can I accomplish it over period by first using CentOS on my local machine?

CentOS is a fine to use as your web server. You could install a typical LAMP setup without too much fuss. I've included a link that walks you through it and an example of the commands you'll run. You'll need to do some configuration of the web server for each site, but that's not too difficult either.

If you do want to go down the Control Panel route, the tutorial also shows you how to install webmin.

http://www.howtoforge.com/quick-n-easy-lamp-server-centos-rhel

apache

yum install httpd httpd-devel
/etc/init.d/httpd start

mysql

yum install mysql mysql-server mysql-devel
/etc/init.d/mysqld start
mysql
mysql> USE mysql;
mysql> UPDATE user SET Password=PASSWORD('newpassword') WHERE user='root';
mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
mysql -u root -p
Enter Password: <your new password>
mysql > create database demo
mysql >GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON demo.* TO 'guest'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'guest' WITH GRANT OPTION;
mysql> UPDATE user SET Password=PASSWORD('guest') WHERE user='guest';

php

yum install php php-mysql php-common php-gd php-mbstring php-mcrypt php-devel php-xml
/etc/init.d/httpd restart
yum install phpmyadmin
nano /etc/httpd/conf.d/phpmyadmin.conf
nano /usr/share/phpmyadmin/conf.inc.php

make sure things start on boot

chkconfig httpd on
chkconfig mysqld on
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The configuration of server in centos machine is very simple- First remove from your mind that you are new in centos,if you you are working in ubuntu then it's ok.

Now come on the topic -

Install the service httpd by the terminal -

yum install httpd  
/etc/init.d/httpd restart
chkconfig httpd on

Then configure it as path - /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

Then install service mysql,php,phpmyadmin as -

yum install mysql-server
service mysqld restart
yum install php53 php-mysql
yum install phpmyadmin

The mysql configuration path is /etc/cf.cnf

and set php configuration in /etc/php.ini file

/etc/init.d/httpd restart
/etc/init.d/mysqld restart

Then your LAMP server is ready for the use.

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Thanks for the answer. I's suggest you edit it (check the Help button) to make it easier to read (mostly formatting). –  vonbrand Apr 30 '13 at 13:25

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