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I would like to have a setup where I can tell any of two servers to be the "main"-server on a specific IP (for redundancy reasons). Both servers should be accessible at any given time but only one should respond to public IP.

IP-restriction is because of infrastructure dependencies beyond my control.

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2 Answers 2

Sounds like a job for windows Network Load Balancing service. Which doesn't necessarily do load balancing, you can specify a primary node and just use the secondary node for failover.

NLB is fairly straight forward to configure, you need 3 IP address in total (one per server and a virtual IP for the web service).

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb742455.aspx

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I'll look into it! –  Toft Apr 1 '11 at 9:02

I believe I found a rather simple solution that will work for us: http://www.localwisdom.com/blog/2010/02/iis-7-reverse-proxy-share-1-ip-with-multiple-webservers/

Excerpt: Modules: ARR, URL rewriter

“For a very simple reverse proxy, all you have to do is:

  1. Select the server node on inetmgr.

  2. Double click on Application Request Routing icon.

  3. Select/check “Enable proxy”.

  4. Select/check “Use URL Rewrite to inspect incoming requests.

  5. Enter the server of where you want to route the request to in “Reverse proxy” – ie. (myserver.contoso.com).

Our setup would be: www1, www2 - internal names for servers, these are referenced by separate IIS7 instance (responding to public IP and domain) which reverse proxies www1 or www2 as we please. ARR can be scripted too which would enable us to implement event-driven scenarios.

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You'll need to use some form of LB with that to ensure redundancy of the r-proxy host too. –  TristanK Apr 2 '11 at 1:52

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