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As part of a server burn-in process, I am running nbench (BYTEmark). The results show two FLOATING-POINT Indexes and two INTEGER Indexes in the results, one under "Original Bytemark" and the other under "Linux data below". Which is the "real" score?

Where are the results with some lines removed for brevity:

TEST                : Iterations/sec.  : Old Index   : New Index
                    :                  : Pentium 90* : AMD K6/233*
--------------------:------------------:-------------:------------
NUMERIC SORT        :          1392.4  :      35.71  :      11.73
STRING SORT         :          175.36  :      78.36  :      12.13
BITFIELD            :      5.6922e+08  :      97.64  :      20.39
FP EMULATION        :          195.48  :      93.80  :      21.64
FOURIER             :           32758  :      37.26  :      20.93
ASSIGNMENT          :          42.053  :     160.02  :      41.50
IDEA                :          7207.4  :     110.23  :      32.73
HUFFMAN             :          2635.8  :      73.09  :      23.34
NEURAL NET          :          50.659  :      81.38  :      34.23
LU DECOMPOSITION    :          1897.4  :      98.30  :      70.98
==========================ORIGINAL BYTEMARK RESULTS==========================
INTEGER INDEX       : 85.367
FLOATING-POINT INDEX: 66.793
Baseline (MSDOS*)   : Pentium* 90, 256 KB L2-cache, Watcom* compiler 10.0
==============================LINUX DATA BELOW===============================
MEMORY INDEX        : 21.734
INTEGER INDEX       : 20.984
FLOATING-POINT INDEX: 37.046
Baseline (LINUX)    : AMD K6/233*, 512 KB L2-cache, gcc 2.7.2.3, libc-5.4.38
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Both scores are "real", but they're relative to different systems. The "Baseline" listed after each set of results lists the characteristics of the system that the speed is relative to. The second set is probably more useful as it relates to a more modern setup.

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