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I know virtually nothing about webhosting or SSL encryption. My company has 2 SSL certificates through godaddy for our outlook web app. They are both about to renew, and I just want to make sure we need them both, or at least understand them a bit better. Here is what they say.

(1) webmail.example.org

Standard (Turbo) SSL (1Year)(annual)

(2) webmail.example.org

Standard Multiple Domain (UCC) SSL Up to 5 Domains - 1 year (annual)

However, when I click "Manage Certificate," they both have "Standard UCC SSL" listed under Type.

It feels like we are paying for 2 Certificates but we only need 1. Am I right, or what am I missing?

Thank you.

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migrated from superuser.com Apr 6 '11 at 19:09

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You only need one, but which one depends on some factors. The UCC cert is the same thing as the other, plus it includes Alternate Subject Names. A certificate is issued for a particular Subject Name, in your case a web address; but you can put more than one on a cert (useful and/or necessary in cases where one server has multiple sites).

If you only have one web address that uses SSL; you probably just want the Standard SSL cert (which will be the cheaper of the two as well). If you have multiple sites, you probably want the UCC SSL Cert.

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You are right you should only have one SSL.

If you have an SSL valid for a particular (sub)domain that's all you need. A multi domain license is as it says, valid for multiple domain. It's normally cheaper and easier to mange one certificate but it does not do anything different.

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