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I'm an old hand at Linux but am new to Debian. On Debian 6, I apt-got mysql and then started it. I mucked around with the my.cnf and messed it up...apparently in debian-land, they really want to start on 127.0.0.1:3306, though I'll only be using socket connections.

So I put the stock debian my.cnf back in place. Now when I do a /etc/init.d/mysql restart I get this:

"Checking for corrupt, not cleanly closed and upgrade needing tables.."

/var/log/syslog has this:

Apr  8 13:48:12 debian mysqld_safe: mysqld from pid file /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid ended
Apr  8 13:48:13 debian mysqld_safe: Starting mysqld daemon with databases from /var/lib/mysql
Apr  8 13:48:13 debian mysqld: 110408 10:48:13 [Note] Plugin 'FEDERATED' is disabled.
Apr  8 13:48:13 debian mysqld: 110408 10:48:13  InnoDB: Started; log sequence number 0 44233
Apr  8 13:48:13 debian mysqld: 110408 10:48:13 [Note] Event Scheduler: Loaded 0 events
Apr  8 13:48:13 debian mysqld: 110408 10:48:13 [Note] /usr/sbin/mysqld: ready for connections.
Apr  8 13:48:13 debian mysqld: Version: '5.1.49-3'  socket: '/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock'  port: 3306  (Debian)
Apr  8 13:48:14 debian /etc/mysql/debian-start[5849]: Upgrading MySQL tables if necessary.

So...is this one of those "here is what I'm doing in case you want to know" status messages ("just telling you that I'm checking, etc."), or does this indicate some sort of problem?

I ask because I've never seen this before, and I don't find that string in /etc/init.d/mysql, so it must be coming from MySQL itself.

I don't think I got that earlier (prior to my my.cnf diddling), but I'm not 100% certain, as I was not adequately caffeinated earlier.

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1 Answer 1

Yes, that always happens. Nothing to worry about.

To disable the 127.0.0.1:3306 listener, add skip-networking to your config.

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what does skip-networking actually does?? –  jpganz18 Jan 31 '13 at 21:57
    
@jpganz18 Prevents the MySQL process from binding on any TCP ports whatsoever, on the assumption that all connections to it will be through Unix sockets. –  Shane Madden Feb 1 '13 at 1:15

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