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Does anyone of you know any good packet generator tool for IPv6. I am very familiar with hping3, but don't know if it supports IPv6.

I am looking for something which can send, tcp, udp, icmp, and where , I can change the ip address and port numbers. Suppose my client sends udp IPv6 packet to destination (sport 3000, dport 4000) . My server should be able to receive the packet and say (I received the packet on port 4000 ) basically I am also looking for some kind of capture capability which hping provides, to work in Linux and gelling this with expect and tcl scripts . Not concerned with performance and no throughput testing

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Apr 26 '11 at 12:01

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1 Answer 1

I think this depends on what kind of packet generation you are doing.

If you're looking for IPv6 throughput testing, iperf is probably what you want.

If you want to generate IPv6 packets with interesting combinations of flags and protocols, scapy is good at this. The author did a presentation on IPv6 and scapy

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Thanks mike..I am looking for something which can send, tcp, udp, icmp, and where , I can change the ip address and port numbers. Suppose my client sends udp ipv6 packet to destination (sport 3000, dport 4000) . My server should be able to receive the packet and say (I received the packet on port 4000 ) basically I am also looking for some kind of capture capability which hping provides, to work in linux and gelling this with expect and tcl scripts –  Adi Apr 26 '11 at 2:13
    
@Adi, scapy will do all the above. –  Mike Pennington Apr 26 '11 at 2:20
    
Thanks mike. Appreciate your help –  Adi Apr 26 '11 at 2:59
    
@Adi, one thing to note... scapy reads the packet data in python... you should investigate whether simply printing the packet contents is sufficient to integrate scapy with your TCL scripts. Also, scapy probably isn't going to be great at receiving high throughput from clients. Another high-throughput option (that is less flexible for packet mangling than scapy) is netcat6 –  Mike Pennington Apr 26 '11 at 11:45

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