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One that doesn't get marked as spam filters, of course.

I'm familiar with Ubuntu, but have never messed with Postfix or Sendmail anything before. Basically, this is what I want:

  • Have my own name@mydomain.com address. Be able to send emails and receive emails without getting marked as spam.
  • My web servers will also connect to this box to send out emails for my website. I want to connect to it via SMTP.
  • Ideally, I want each "user" on the Ubuntu OS to automatically have an email account created for them.

Which tutorial should I follow to do this? Thanks.

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I just want to comment on your question. The How-To documents listed here will all work when used on their designed distribution. However, when you're building your mail server, it is a good practice to understand everything you're doing instead of just pasting commands. If you understand how the server works, it's much easier to troubleshoot if something isn't working. You should have documentation on hand for each component of your email environment (SMTP daemon, POP3/IMAP daemons, Authentication daemon etc) and give it a good look before you turn anything on. –  Sean C. Apr 28 '11 at 12:21
    
Keep in mind, deliverability is a huge murky matter that many many people have no idea about. Having an SMTP server that has Reverse DNS, SPF records, and DKIM is a bare minimum, and having a dedicated IP with a good reputation helps too! Good luck. –  JonLim Apr 28 '11 at 20:30
    
@JonLim...is there a tutorial that tells me all about deliverability? –  Alex Apr 29 '11 at 10:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The ISPmail tutorials are geared toward Debian, but Ubuntu is similar enough that you should have no trouble using them. This is how I set up my first email server, and I found it very simple and straightforward.

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Does that tutorial teach you steps to ensure mail doesn't get caught in spam filters? –  Alex May 1 '11 at 0:35
    
@Alex IIRC, it mentions the basics -- make sure you have postmaster@ and abuse@ accounts, make sure your SMTP is authenticated so random spammers aren't using it, etc. etc. There are cases where more aggressive measures are needed, and that is not covered by the tutorial. –  HedgeMage May 1 '11 at 6:11

A simple search on Google ubuntu+postfix+howto has multiple of results. Take you pick. Here is one for you. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/PostfixBasicSetupHowto

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There are a number of mail servers that are being used out there (Postfix, qmail, sendmail, etc. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_mail_servers for a list of them). You want to do some research into the various ones out there and pick the right one for you as their feature sets and complexity will likely play a part in which server is right for you. Postfix seems to be a very popular choice, often coming pre-installed with many distros.

After having chosen one, you need to do some reading on your server of choice. You'll have to learn the various configuration options out there and choose ones that are best suited for your situation.

The following mail gives you some idea to configure Mail server

http://flurdy.com/docs/postfix/

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Search on HowToForge - EMail section

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