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I've got following situation, I currently I use dm-crpyt on top of vlm on my rootfs and I need initramfs for unlock and mount LVM volumes.

It works well with modular kernel, I compile kernel, create initramfs using modules from the kernel and i works well.
But how can I create initramfs with non-modular kernel? Is that possible or is there better way how to create initramfs or unlock and mount LVM?

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Have a look at dracut, the swiss army knife for creating a proven good initramfs. It's modularized script approach will scour automatically or kernel-parameters based for all your rootfs volumes and key devices. I don't see how this issue has anything to do with kernel modularization. But please do provide some additional info if you think it does.

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Well I create initramfs on my own and for dm-crypt i need to load few modules aes_generic, sha256_generic, dm-crypt and ahci for detect block device. I am not sure, how can I load these modules, if I've got my own non-modular kernel. If I've got modular kernel I can copy them into my initramfs and it works. Anyway, I'll take a look on what you suggest. –  Ency May 6 '11 at 19:56
    
If you have the drivers compiled in the kernel, you will not need the modules at all. They won't be even built, so you won't be even able to. dracut I believe has initramfs build time detection mechanisms for this, since the builtin vs modular and dependency information is all readily available from /lib/modules/your-kernel-version/modules.builtins. So no matter how you set up your kernel, same dracut command will make an initramfs that has exactly the modules you need and none of what you don't. –  lkraav May 7 '11 at 15:20
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