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I have 2 internet lines from 2 different ISPs. 1 ISP needs to use manual proxy configuration and the other do not need ( no proxy ). I need to combine these two lines ( load balance or failover ). Which proxy software can I use ( on MS Windows ).

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closed as off-topic by Chris S Oct 8 '13 at 17:05

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3 Answers

I would rather suggest Hardware based solution. We are using TP-LInk R480T+ 2 WAN port router which works great in our environment. We've 2 different ISP of different bandwidth and 10 users so we've connected the load balance router with our wi-fi router. It can be work as failover or load balance. You can even specify the load manually.

You can check the specs from the following link. TP-Link also have 4 WAN load balance. http://www.tp-link.com/products/productDetails.asp?class=router&pmodel=TL-R480T%2B

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You can look into pfSense and ClearOS. Both are free and have lots of functionality. These are standalone distro's which would need to be installed on a separate machine.

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Depending on what you mean by combine, this is pretty easy to do.

If you want to balance general web-browsing traffic outbound, OpenBSD's pf fits the bill for a general-purpose firewall very well with this capability.

http://www.openbsd.org/faq/pf/pools.html

Shows you how to do this.

Keep in mind, this will NOT allow any single stream to use the combined bandwidth from both connections, and this is very complicated (realistically, not possible) to do when you have two connections from two different ISPs.

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