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I'm considering upgrading to a business plan for my home office with 5 static IP addresses. Currently I have the base, 1.5 Mbps down DSL package (makes me cry). I have my PIX 501 setup with PPPoE and from what I understand, AT&T still forces you to use PPPoE with their static IP packages.

Before I do this, I want to make sure my PIX can handle this and I want to be ready to configure my PIX if it can do the job.

For this question, we'll say this is what I get from AT&T:

169.129.154.7 Broadcast (programmed in the RedBack, not useable by customer)
169.129.154.6 Router (WAN interface/Gateway)
169.129.154.5 Free for use on Lan(public/routable IP address)
169.129.154.4 Free for use on Lan(public/routable IP address)
169.129.154.3 Free for use on Lan(public/routable IP address)
169.129.154.2 Free for use on Lan(public/routable IP address)
169.129.154.1 Free for use on Lan(public/routable IP address)
169.129.154.0 Network (programmed in the RedBack, not useable by customer)

First question: Would the 169.129.154.6 be what I assign the outside interface on my PIX or would that be the 169.129.154.5? My command in the PIX would be:

ip address outside 169.129.154.6 255.255.255.248

Second question: Currently my internal network is 192.168.1.x. Say I want the 169.129.154.5 IP address (or the 169.129.154.4 if the .5 is the PIX outside) to go to my server that has an internal IP address of 192.168.1.10. Assume the server is only a web server. Are these the commands I would use?

static (inside,outside) 169.129.154.5 192.168.1.10 netmask 255.255.255.255
access-list inbound permit tcp any host 169.129.154.5 eq www

No before you tear me up, I am a developer, and by no means a Cisco guy. This stuff is stressful, I'd rather be coding!

Any help will be appreciated!

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1 Answer

Your commands look good.

You say this is a 5 ip block? When Bell allocates a /29, they'll tell you one address is the gateway. That is their gateway, i.e. your destination route. What address you choose for your PIX outside address is then one of the remaining 5 addresses. So you can expect:

169.129.154.0/29
169.129.154.1 = Bell's Gateway
169.129.154.2 = PIX
169.129.154.3 = NAT to WWW
169.129.154.4 = <OPEN>
169.129.154.5 = <OPEN>
169.129.154.6 = <OPEN>
169.129.154.7 = Broadcast

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