Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We want to use AD as a regular LDAP for storing and accessing our application data in fast and reliable way. We have two physical server and want to organize some sort of clustering for AD and its data. What is the best-practice for such task?

share|improve this question
1  
The best practice for "clustering" AD is, I'd say, "Don't". Just use all the machines you would have had as cluster members as separate domain controllers. –  RobM Jun 17 '11 at 21:51
    
Is your approach correct when I use AD just as regular LDAP? (like in serverfault.com/questions/195025/…) –  Sasha Jun 17 '11 at 21:54
2  
I think so. You cluster to improve availability right? AD already has a mechanism for that. Don't think of the availability of this or that server, think of the availability of the service. –  RobM Jun 17 '11 at 23:30
    
Thanks for answers. Yes, to improve availability. –  Sasha Jun 19 '11 at 17:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

AD is already clustered. You bind to the domain using the correct entries that AD has stored in DNS. Edit - to clarify :
You don't do anything to cluster AD. The process of dcpromo to make a server a DC will automatically make the new DC take part in AD replication. That keeps the AD database synced. You don't need to do anything to make you application failover-aware either; you bind to the domain, not a single serve

Having said that, it's not a great idea to store much of your own data in AD's schema. You may want to make your own partition, or use LDS (formerly ADAM.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank for answering. But what does it mean "already clustered"? I have two servers, what do I need to make a AD clustered? –  Sasha Jun 17 '11 at 21:50
3  
You don't do anything to cluster AD. The process of dcpromo to make a server a DC will automatically make the new DC take part in AD replication. That keeps the AD database synced. You don't need to do anything to make you application failover-aware either; you bind to the domain, not a single server. –  mfinni Jun 17 '11 at 21:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.