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I'm working on setting up a new server for sending email and I'm trying to figure out how to configure postfix to send email from 3 different domains. Ideally the nobody user on the server should be able to email using *@domain1.com, *@domain2.com, *@domain3.com just by changing the from field in the email that is being sent.

Incoming email is handled by google apps and port 25 (incoming) on the server is blocked.

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2 Answers 2

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Postfix appends the value of the main.cf 'myorigin' parameter to unqualified sender addresses. So you should set $myorigin to whichever of 'domain1.com', 'domain2.com' or 'domain3.com' is the normal default.

Postfix doesn't do anything special to prevent any address/domain being used as the sender. You can enforce it if you like using a check_sender_access map in smtpd_mumble_restrictions.

If you want to use the value of the 'From:' header to specify the envelope sender, you can use 'sendmail -t' to trust the headers. Only do this for mail for which you really do trust the headers (i.e., don't use it in content filters where mail may have been BCC-ed or otherwise have headers that don't match the envelope).

As Evan said above, the mynetworks main.cf parameter usually controls which clients can use your server as a relay. See the BASIC_CONFIGURATION_README, SOHO_README or STANDARD_CONFIGURATION_README that comes with your distribution or via http://www.postfix.org/documentation.html.

Local submission via the sendmail command can use '-f' to specify the sender. Do check authorized_submit_users to make sure the nobody user can use local submission. The upstream default is

$ postconf authorized_submit_users
authorized_submit_users = static:anyone

but your distribution may set it to something else by default.

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You should be able to configure the "mynetworks" setting to be allowed to send e-mail from whatever IP address you're submitting from (see http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#mynetworks) and be good to go. For example, as long as 127.0.0.1 is allowed to relay if you're submitting mail via SMTP to the local machine, you should be set.

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@womble: I appreciate the edit, but if I'm wrong I don't want the rep. points for it. That's just not fair to others. I think I should probably just delete my answer. –  Evan Anderson Jun 19 '09 at 4:45

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