Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We got this supermicro server comes with Intel RAID Controller (iCH9 etc). I have enabled the RAID in BIOS and created a RAID 1 with 2 member disks (1TB SATA).

The installation went fine but the command: df -h and fdisk -l looks strange to me. How come the Centos still sees 2 disks (sda sdb). Just wondering do I have RAID1 running or not, if one disk failed, can I just plug a new one in and no down time for the server? Thanks.

Output:

[root@w11 ~]# df -h
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00
                      854G  1.5G  809G   1% /
/dev/mapper/ddf1_4c53492020202020100000601000101347114711a3c8ce6cp1
                       99M   20M   75M  21% /boot
tmpfs                  24G     0   24G   0% /dev/shm
[root@w11 ~]# fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1          13      104391   83  Linux
/dev/sda2              14      121454   975474832+  8e  Linux LVM

Disk /dev/sdb: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1   *           1          13      104391   83  Linux
/dev/sdb2              14      121454   975474832+  8e  Linux LVM
share|improve this question
    
I beg thee, use software raid at the OS level instead of this pile of turd. Motherboard vendors (or Intel) should be shot behind a barn for using "RAID" as a marketing term.. –  pauska Jun 30 '11 at 11:13
    
Thanks mate. Agreed. Shot them from behind. –  starchx Jun 30 '11 at 14:15
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It looks like you're probably using FakeRaid (Sorry the link is to an Ubuntu site, but the description is still relevant). In my experience, that often leaves the physical disks visible to the OS (whereas most true hardware raid controllers don't).

But df's output does seem to confirm that you're using RAID--or at least some sort of disk abstraction layer, since you haven't mounted sdaX or sdbX directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. As long as it can protect from 1 disk fail, I am peace with fakeraid for now. –  starchx Jun 30 '11 at 14:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.