Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have shared one folder on our Windows 2008 server with Everyone Read/Write access rights. I would like to prevent file sharing between users. For example if user No1 upload file to shared folder a user No2 will not see files which was uploaded by user No1 and will not have access.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First thing's first, configure your permissions properly. If you don't want everybody to have read/write access to everything, then don't. You may want to give everybody permissions to create directories at the root of the share and then give "CREATOR OWNER" full access.

After you've dialed in your permissions, turn on access based enumeration in order to prevent users from seeing folders they do not have rights to.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem as I see it is that the OP is dealing with a single folder to which everyone has read/write permission on and users are creating files in this single folder, so ABE isn't going to work. If the OP created a separate folder for each user then ABE would solve the problem. –  joeqwerty Jul 8 '11 at 14:45
    
I think that's what Jason meant. If everyone can create a directory, they can create their own directory, they would then have full access(Creator Owner) to the contents of what is now their personal subdirectory. Right? –  Daniel Ball Jul 8 '11 at 15:07
    
The OP seems to be implying a single folder where users are creating files and/or folders. As such, ABE won't work. The OP would need to create separate folders for each user, secure those folders to the appropriate user, and then enable ABE. Any folder or file created in the parent folder is going to be accessible by every user by virtue of the fact that they all have read/write permissions on the parent folder. The only way to enable ABE is to create a folder for each user, secured to that user. –  joeqwerty Jul 8 '11 at 15:23
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.