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I'm about to port a high traffic website to Drupal v6.x (maybe 7.x) on a VPS.

I have a bit of experience with Linux in the name of Ubuntu. Of course I can relay on a managed VPS package. How ever I would like to pick the best set-up.

The VPS package I picked consists the following soft- and hardware:

  • CentOS 5
  • CPU: 1 Ghz (1 core)
  • Memory: 512 MB
  • Disk: 40 GB Raid 6

Now I wonder what the best configuration is. With that I mean as basic web- and mailserver but also what I should do for caching. I read a lot of info on Drupal.org, there is also a package named Pressflow which is an optimized version of Drupal for high-traffic websites.

Some names as these were mentioned:

  • memcache (cache module on linux?)
  • nginx (some kind of webserver better as apache?)
  • varnish (cache module on linux?)

I understand what they are but how they fit in a picture?

So basically I'm looking for someone who can clear the picture a bit up.

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1 Answer 1

nginx is probably the way to go given the size of the vps

you may need to re-spec your vps if its a "high traffic" site, you may also have to define what you mean by high traffic also because by my understanding that size of vps isnt going to cope running both mysql and nginx&php-fpm

memcache is only useful if you have spare ram, you wouldnt want it taking away what little ram you have for a high traffic site even if its only taking 64mb of ram

varnish is a caching program that sits in front of your webserver or webservers and is very powerful but this often requires a fair bit of setting up to get working correctly, often a well tuned nginx & php-fpm config more than meets most peoples needs without over complexifying the setup

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