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I've just installed an ESXi (4.1) system. The install appears to have completed successfully, and the host boots to the yellow/black login screen. Additionally:

  • I can log in to the local configuration interface.
  • The host is able to successfully acquire an ip using dhcp.
  • I can ping that address.
  • I can ssh to that address if I enable remote tech support access.

But...

  • I cannot access the system via http (even though the screen says, "Download tools to manage this host from http://my-host/".
  • I cannot connect to this host using the vSphere client.

There are no intervening firewalls that could be blocking this connection.

From what I've been able to figure out from the documentation and various VMware forum posts and KB articles, this doesn't appear to be a common failure mode. Can you provide any suggestions to resolve this?

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3  
Are you trying to access the host by name? If so, there's a name resolution problem. What is your internal name resolution mechanism? DNS? WINS? Broadcasts? –  joeqwerty Jul 12 '11 at 20:56
1  
DNS was what came to mind first... Is the host registered on your DNS server? Try connecting to the host via IP. Not enough detail of your environment to give an accurate solution. –  xeon Jul 12 '11 at 21:32
    
As I mentioned in the question, I am able to (a) ping the host and (b) connect to the host via ssh. Name resolution is not a problem. The behavior is identical using either the name of the ip address. –  larsks Jul 13 '11 at 0:39
    
What port? IIRC ESXi sometimes uses some strange ones. Perhaps try an nmap to see what's running http? Alternatively, a netstat -ln on local console might do the trick –  Michael Lowman Jul 14 '11 at 17:27
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It looks like the install was simply wonky. A reinstall fixed it. It appears that for whatever reason the original install failed to start a number of services (e.g., the web service and the management agent). –  larsks Jul 14 '11 at 17:51
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