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Right now mydomain.com is accessible to the world because I made an association at godaddy's configuration page, which tells mydomain.com is located at x.x.x.x.

As I'm planning to configure a DNS Server I would like to make mydomain.com accessible to the world throught my DNS Server instead of using the godaddy DNS. After adding an A record to my DNS Server what do I need to do in order to let other DNS Servers and the world know mydomain.com exists and is located at my DNS Server?

My machine is located at Amazon EC2.

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Aug 11 '11 at 23:12

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1  
You are missing (wrong) terminologies frequently. Are you running bind on your EC2? Why bother.. why not use Route 53. –  Laykes Aug 11 '11 at 23:07
    
@Laykes If you run a lot of domains, Route 53 gets pricey, as it's $1/domain/month. –  ceejayoz Aug 12 '11 at 1:20

4 Answers 4

Well, to make that work you'd need to register the IP (And a hostname, like ns1.mydomain.com) as a DNS server and tell godaddy to use that server as the authoritative one. It'll show up on the whois information something like this (whois'd serverfault.com as this example):

  Domain servers in listed order:
  NS1.SERVERFAULT.COM
  NS2.SERVERFAULT.COM
  NS3.SERVERFAULT.COM

After you do this, all requests for mydomain.com will be sent to your DNS server (Assuming it's IP doesn't change, that will sort of break things if it does) by the root DNS servers.

hth

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Thanks a lot for the answers, but i'm trying to do is avoid going through goddady's DNS Server . Adding any record to godaddy's mydomain.com zone file will make me still go through goddady's DNS Server. To make it clear, i would like to stop using godaddy file zone.I mean i don't want to add nothing at goddady's website, so other DNS Server will contact my DNS Server when someone asks for mydomain.com without contacting with godaddy DNS Server at all. Thanks a lot :) –  user873561 Aug 11 '11 at 23:51

You should pick up a couple of Elastic IPs (i.e., static IP for EC2 instances) and associate it with your instances running the DNS server in EC2. You basically need a static IP for your name server in the WHOIS configuration at GoDaddy.

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Thanks a lot for the answers, but i'm trying to do is avoid going through goddady's DNS Server . Adding any record to godaddy's mydomain.com zone file will make me still go through goddady's DNS Server. To make it clear, i would like to stop using godaddy file zone.I mean i don't want to add nothing at goddady's website, so other DNS Server will contact my DNS Server when someone asks for mydomain.com without contacting with godaddy DNS Server at all. Thanks a lot :) –  user873561 Aug 11 '11 at 23:50
    
I should have been more specific: you need to get an Elastic IP, then in the WHOIS configuration at the registrar (which I assumed to be GoDaddy but may not be), you would set up the domain's nameserver as "ns1.mydomain.com" with that Elastic IP address. After you do that, any DNS lookups for your domain will go to ns1.mydomain.com, which will be the DNS server you have running in EC2. You will not be interacting with the GoDaddy DNS service. You may have to use the GoDaddy WHOIS config, if the domain is registered there. –  cjc Aug 11 '11 at 23:56

Like the other answers state, you will have to get ips from EC2 to associate them with your DNS server and create nameservers like:

ns1.whatever.com

ns2.whatever.com

Because you registered your domain with GoDaddy, you WILL HAVE to tell them what ip address(es) your DNS server is using. As your registrar they are they ones who will let the internet know what DNS servers should be authoritative for your domain.

You purchased your domain with them, so they will play a part. As far as your DNS goes, once you register your nameservers with GoDaddy and the internet recognizes your new nameservers, then you have full control of DNS and your main zone file. The only time you would need to deal with GoDaddy were if you planned on changing nameservers or for your registration.

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A registrar will always be involved in DNS - someone has to mediate between you and the .com root server to say where the name servers for mydomain.com are. Note that once the registrar has registered your domain into .com, they are no longer actively involved, unless they are also the DNS authority for your domain. All registrars provide a mechanism for defining a different authority for the domain.

So, if you go to the godaddy control panel and add your IP as the name server for your DNS, then this will get registered at the .com root, and any lookups from that point forward will go directly to your DNS server. Nothing will go via godaddy.

If you want to take godaddy out of the loop entirely then you only option is to transfer the domain to a different registrar. You will still need to add your IP as a name server in their control panel. Again, once this is done, they will no longer be actively involved in processing DNS lookups for your domain.

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