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Is it some standard/practice or technical requirement which force network engineers to use this IP address pattern?

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closed as off topic by MDMarra, voretaq7, Zoredache, Ben Pilbrow, Chris S Aug 30 '11 at 17:48

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All private addresses are not 192.168.0.0/16. –  MDMarra Aug 30 '11 at 17:45
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This is a site for professionals. This is such an incredibly basic question that any professional should know it. –  MDMarra Aug 30 '11 at 17:49
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Ok, lesson learned –  ish1301 Aug 30 '11 at 17:50
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3 Answers

RFC 1918 establishes ranges for private address space.

  • 192.168.0.0/16
  • 172.16.0.0/12
  • 10.0.0.0/8
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There are a number of 'reserved' ranges as defined by the IETF. 192.168 is the standard used by linkysys and many other vendors for their home networking requirement. But there is no requirement for this specific subnet for home networks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reserved_IP_addresses

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