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I'm getting 9 second load times on a very powerful server. Query time is .05 and total php time is 9 seconds. Not good!

I took a look at my list of apache modules and I'm wondering if there's a culprit in the bunch:

Asis
AuthnDefault
Env
Expires
Fileprotect
Frontpage
Headers
Mod SuPhp (especially this one, what does it do? I've never seen this before on our other servers)
Proxy
Version

Bcmath
CHI
Calendar
Curl
CurlSSL
FTP
FileInfo
GD
Iconv
Imap
Magic Quotes
Mbregex
Mysql
Mysql of the system
OpenSSL
POSIX
Path Info Check
Pear
Phar
SQLite3
Sockets
Zip
Zlib

Any ideas?

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You should probably go read about what each of those modules do. Your application(s) requirements will determine which modules you need enabled. –  jscott Aug 31 '11 at 16:29
1  
Your problem is almost certainly NOT related to apache modules. Look to your code first - I suspect sloppy PHP, which the folks on stackoverflow.com can probably help with. –  voretaq7 Aug 31 '11 at 16:44
2  
You likely don't need all of them, but none of those should be causing a nine second load time. I'd suspect your code. –  ceejayoz Aug 31 '11 at 16:45
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2 Answers

You probably don't need most of them. You've got 3 choices really:

  1. Leave it alone, "if it aint broke don't fix it"
  2. Go through and comment out one module at at time, see if anything breaks.
  3. Read up on what every module does, figure out if you should need it, disable those you don't need. This should usually be done in conjunction with #2, so if something breaks you know what it was.

That said; having a ton of modules loaded on a modern machine usually doesn't hurt much. If you're seeing 9 second processing times, it's something in your code. Profile the code (a simple way is to log messages every major step of the code and look at the time stamps).

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You can probably leave them alone in respects to response time. However, it can't hurt to disable them if you know how. Also, consider looking at your apache and mysql configs. That could be part of the problem if you have some nasty queries running.

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