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When I do a yum check-update on a CentOS machine, I see that some updates are from the base repo, and some from the updates repo. Can anyone tell me what the difference between the two are? I have found the repositories guide but that is only about non-standard repositories - it has nothing about the default repositories.

My best guess would be that the base repository would get updated when CentOS goes from (say) 5.5 to 5.6, while in between any new packages would go into the updates repository. But I can't find anything on the internet about it - the search terms are too general to zero in on it.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You said it:

My best guess would be that the base repository would get updated when CentOS goes from (say) 5.5 to 5.6, while in between any new packages would go into the updates repository.

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But do you know that for a fact? Can you point me at a web page that states that this is the policy? Or is it just that's what seems to be happening from what you've observed? –  Hamish Downer Sep 8 '11 at 12:59
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the normal repo is as installed from the official media (dvd etc). updates is just that, updates to packages before the next official release gets made. –  Sirex Sep 8 '11 at 13:14
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I have a CentOS 5.2 that walked up to 5.6 (and several other installation of CentOS). The repo site has always the same directory structure (base, contrib, updates, etc): what changes are the files inside. When a minor release is made available, the base/contrib directories are updated with new files. –  AndrewQ Sep 8 '11 at 13:31
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The Base repo is the core OS as of its release date (e.g. what's on the DVD/ISO media). The updates are the security/bugfix/functionality updates to the base set of packages.

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