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When trying to access a company web site the user cannot get access with their credentials. When trying to access the server shares (e.g. \\servername\share) it also doesn’t work. It takes ages and doesn’t show anything.

But when typing in \\ipaddress\share it works fine … all network settings are set to dhcp.

Does anyone have any ideas?


The server is on a static ip/reserved but the clients are all automatic. Note that i have tried setting the clients dns to static and pointing it to the server, however this didnt work.

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The server is on a static ip/reserved but the clients are all automatic. Note that i have tried setting the clients dns to static and pointing it to the server, however this didnt work. –  waterbear Sep 15 '11 at 9:31
    
What do you see when you try and nslookup the server in question from the failing client? Is it different than from a client that's working? –  MDMarra Sep 15 '11 at 11:28
    
Is the server a DNS server? If it's not, pointing the client to it as a DNS server won't work. –  TristanK Sep 15 '11 at 12:13
    
make sure that your priamry dns is your dhcp router.. which shoul have the correct external dns server automaticaly assigned to it. Also, on your router, make sure your DHCP list resolved the names of the devices you want to access. So instead of mac address it should show name, sometimes you will find that under ARP list. WIth out that you cannot call DNS names directly.unless you have a name server somewhere else, then set the DNS to that using the DHCP server. Ya? –  ppumkin Dec 15 '11 at 17:02

2 Answers 2

Sounds like a pretty standard DNS problem to me. Make sure that the clients are querying the right DNS server.

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Consider using fixed IP addresses for your servers instead of DHCP registration for them and using a fixed DNS for those particular hosts. This will provide a fixed point for communication rather than a situation where you may have leases expiring on DHCP addresses and the old IP information is in your client's ARP cache.

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1) Just because a server might be set to DHCP doesn't mean its IP address changes. That's what DHCP reservations are for. 2) By saying "all network setting are set to dhcp", I'm fairly certain the OP means that all client machines are set to DHCP. –  EEAA Sep 14 '11 at 16:31
    
That is a reasonable assumption and one I considered, but I opted in the end to take the poster's literal expression of all networking under DHCP –  James Pulley Sep 14 '11 at 16:51

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