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I’m running a server with Win 2003 Standard and when I’m remoting in I see that the I/O Other Delta is exceptionally high. If I don’t move the mouse or touch anything it’s around 4GB but If I start to move the mouse around it goes up to over 100GB. What precisely gets included in Other I/O and is it normal to have I/O this high? What is causing this and how can I resolve it?

We notice that when the server is stressed in this regard it negatively affects system performance and is causing network issues for other applications. We have at least 3GB of RAM left of the 11GB installed and the CPU is consistently below 20-30% usage.

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3 Answers 3

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If your remote desktop is configured for high resolution and there is a lot of movement on the display, a lot of data will be generated towards the terminal.

You can configure the remote desktop session to use lower graphics resolutions to reduce traffic.

There are other tools (TightVNC is quite good) that will compress the data and allow very fast communications.

That is not to say that the Microsoft clients are bad. The MS Terminal Server also has lots of configuration, you need to tweak them to your requirements.

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I see this issue is closed, but I wanted to give some more data, since I cam ehere looking for solution to my issue. I'm pretty convinced it can't really happen because user is moving his mouse or doing whatever at his screen - if the numbers are growing over 100GB of data. It's possible it somehow is related to his activity, but sending 100GB of data for moving your mouse? Hardly. I had similar issue, with Notepad++ growing its "I/O Other Data", approximately for 11MB/sec, as long as the user (whose account was it at) has the Notepad++ focused. When he minimizes the Notepad++, the growing sto –  userfuser Oct 30 '12 at 15:54

IO Other includes network IO. As desktop bitmaps are sent to the remote desktop client the delta will go up. When you move your mouse around the bitmaps change so it has to send data to your client. When you're just sitting there then there's no screen refresh happening and thus no new bitmaps to send over.

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On windows 2003 with AMD cpu there may be a time drift that cause unreasonably high performance counter readings. You can read about this here. Try adding the /usepmtimer switch that is mentioned in the article.

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