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I'm working with 10 computers of similar build (only graphics card and hd are different) running windows 7.

When I use PsShutdown (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897541.aspx) to shut down all machines some of them quickly shut down (a couple of seconds), but others take their time: sometimes more then 30 seconds, maybe even a minute.

I want them to shutdown quickly, does anyone know what the differences could be? What should I investigate?

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1 Answer 1

Look at what services are running. Are they running all running the same services and are they at the same revision level? You might find that one computer might have the volume shadow service running while another that shuts down doesn't. I'm only using VSS as an example. On a server for example, I achieve faster shutdowns on an Exchange server by running a script that shuts the Exchange related services before initiating the shutdown than if I just issue the shutdown command.

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Additionally, Simon could try to request the shutdown of all computers in parallel (a simple batch or python script would do). Unfortunately, psshutdown processes the workstations sequentially. –  robert Sep 19 '11 at 12:29
    
@robert: yeah I thought about that, but I don't want to install additional software if I can prevent it, and launching the tasks in parallel from a batch file means I cannot monitor whether or not they all finished - at least not as far as I know. –  Simon Groenewolt Sep 20 '11 at 18:11
    
@Grant Schmarr: thanks for your response, the machines are all new and fairly clean, so I don't think they are running different server processes, but I'll check anyway. –  Simon Groenewolt Sep 20 '11 at 18:15

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