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I'm planning to create a "voting tool" to help votation in a conference of my NGO.

My idea would be to create a small app with node.js + mongodb for server and websocket for pushing to the various clients.

My machine is a not so young macbook pro 2.33 GHz, 2GB ram 667Mh. Is it powerful enough to support a server+db for, let say 40-50 machines?

Is the wi-fi router inside (airport) enough or is better to use an external router?

thanks

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marked as duplicate by John Gardeniers, Chris S Jul 31 '12 at 14:46

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3 Answers 3

To get some kind of idea, you can write a simple curl/wget script that replicates some of the GET requests your users will be making and run multiple instances of it from another machine.

It's a quick and dirty way to at least simulate some load. Not perfect by any means, but at least you can validate if there are any glaring performance problems in your application logic.

You could use a load testing suite or something but that's probably overkill for your question.

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suggest me also these testing suite you will have green light! –  Bakaburg Sep 21 '11 at 19:11
    
This link will give you a good rundown. For simple stuff I tend to use JMeter. –  hross Sep 23 '11 at 10:54

You don't say anything about how big your conference is, how many people you expect to vote, how many workstation/kiosks you're going to provide, etc.

It's hard to imagine this not being enough, but who knows. Your router may simply be slaughtered from everyone downloading movies on your WiFi, and they'll never even hit your app.

So, (as I rummage through my Bag of Wisdom to dig out this oldie but goodie) "It Depends."

Addenda:

Ah, I missed that.

By limiting the number of machines/kiosks, you effectively limit the number of users. So, I would say a MacBook should easily handle 40-50 user. Man, I sure hope so. What is the world coming to when 2.33GHz and 2G of RAM can't support a simple survey for 50 users. (Must resist curmudgeonly "back in my day" anecdotes of large systems with fewer resources than a modern cell phone...)

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thx for the answer Will. actually i wrote it above! it will be 40-50 machines. And they cannot use my internet connection in case because you have to allow it to share it. –  Bakaburg Sep 21 '11 at 18:08

Most WIFI Routers I have used start having problems as of 20 or so users but I don't know about the airport. 50 users should be fine but for the sake of having your computer be twice as fast buy more ram :) It's extremly cheap and makes your computer faster.

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