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So we have a mixed node set on our network with Win XP Pro, Win 7 Pro, Ubuntu 11.04, Win 2k3 Server Std, etc all within in an Active Directory Environment. We also have network printers that are shared out via servers at each site where ultimately each site has a different subnet (Site 1: 132.98.1.x/24, Site 2: 132.98.2.x/24, etc with a subnet mask if 255.255.255.0). However, the few Win 7 Pro machines we have error out when trying to connect. With our Win XP machines in site 1, there are no issues connecting to the printers at site 2. The error reads exactly as follows:

"Windows couldn't connect to the printer. Check the printer name and try again. If this is a network printer, make sure the printer is turned on, and what the printer address is correct."

Other Important Details

  • Windows firewall is turned off
  • The network location is set to Work for Win 7 machines
  • Other network related programs (WinVNC, FTP, Etc) do work between sites
  • Back-door access to remote directories does not work (ex: \\132.98.2.100\C$) in differeing subnets
  • Symantec Endpoint Protection 11 is installed on ALL machines
  • Connection to network printers does work within the same subnet.
  • Subnets connected via Cisco routers on 192.168.1.0/24
  • Routers are unrestricted between sites

My hunch is that theres an authentication issue, but not sure where to start. How can I get connected to a network printer in a different subnet with Windows 7 Professional?

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3  
nitpick: classful networking doesn't exist anymore. –  MDMarra Sep 23 '11 at 14:41
    
@MarkM Wow, thats a profound statement to me. When did I miss this memo? –  hydroparadise Sep 23 '11 at 14:45
5  
1993 –  MDMarra Sep 23 '11 at 14:51
2  
Damn academia with all of its outdated professors. Thanks for the enlightenment! nitpicks never hurt if open for correction ;) –  hydroparadise Sep 23 '11 at 14:56
    
The problem as I see it is still that a device on 132.98.1.0/24 cannot communicate with a device on 132.98.2.0/24, so you need something in the middle to handle the routing of traffic. Is there a device to accomplish this? –  Coding Gorilla Sep 23 '11 at 15:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Turns out the person that setup the machines used a our bidirectional firewall as the default gateway and almost definately has port 445 blocked. This would explain why just those machines were unable to communicate domain related objects, but could still ping back and forth. Thank you everbody for your input.

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That would do it. The comments on your question should help guide your troubleshooting in the future. –  mfinni Sep 23 '11 at 19:29

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