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My client bought wildcard certificate for domain example.com. We have setup ssl on website which is used under something.more.example.com and the wildcard certificate is reporting problems. Is there a way to workaround this other then changing something.more.example.com to somethingmore.example.com ? I always thought I can have as many subdomains of subdomains as I want with wildcard certificate.

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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think as it is *.example.com it is only valid for immediate sub-domains, it does not support nesting. You'll have to name it somethingmore.example.com, or buy either an explicit something.more.example.com certificate or another wildcard as *.more.example.com.

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You can add the *.more.example.com as a sub alt name to the wildcard or ucc/san. I know ssl.com certs can do it

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Wildcard certificates secure all of the subdomains at the level you specify when you submit your request:

A Wildcard SSL certificate secures your website URL, and an unlimited number of its subdomains. A single Wildcard certificate can secure both www.coolexample.com, and blog.coolexample.com.

Wildcard certificates secure all of the subdomains at the level you specify when you submit your request. Just add an asterisk (*) in the subdomain area of the common name where you want to specify the wildcard. For example:

If you configure *.coolexample.com, you can secure
www.coolexample.com
photos.coolexample.com
blog.coolexample.com, etc.

If you configure *.www.coolexample.com, you can secure
mail.www.coolexample.com
photos.www.coolexample.com
blog.www.coolexample.com, etc.

From GoDaddy Help Center

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