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A faulty power supply fried my motherboard and I need some help. I had a spare motherboard lying around and hooked it up to one of the hard drives to see if I could just continue chugging along. Unfortunately Windows continues to BSOD with error 0000007b which seems to be concerned about the new hard drive controller.

Am I going to have to reformat or is there a way to get Windows to stop using the RAID array and use the new hard drive controller?

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Can you enter Safe Mode? –  George Tasioulis Sep 26 '11 at 22:35
    
No it halts at acpitabl.dat and restarts the system. –  Spencer Ruport Sep 26 '11 at 22:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To replace a failed motherboard with a new motherboard and to then reconfigure Windows to work with the new motherboard, do the following:

  1. Turn off the computer.

  2. Replace the existing motherboard with the new motherboard.

  3. Insert your Windows Server 2003 CD in the CD-ROM drive or the DVD-ROM drive, and start the computer from the CD.

  4. When you are prompted To set up Windows now, press ENTER, press ENTER.

    Setup looks for any previous installations of Windows Server 2003 on the hard disk and then displays a list of any previous installations that it finds.

    Use the arrow keys to select the installation that you want to repair, and then press R to select the To repair the selected Windows installation, press R option.

  5. This will start the repair of your previous Windows Server 2003 installation.

    Follow the instructions on the screen, and allow Setup to complete the repair of the previous Windows Server 2003 installation.

    Setup installs the HAL, the IDE controller drivers, and any other drivers that the new motherboard must have.

  6. After the repair is completed, reinstall any service packs or hotfixes that you had previously installed.

Source: Microsoft KB

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Cool thanks that worked. –  Spencer Ruport Nov 22 '11 at 17:21

If you are lucky, then your RAID1 array is a simply copied pair, and you can run directly from 1 of the hard disks, without any RAID controller or driver.

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That's what I thought too, however, it seems that since it used to be part of a raid pair there is an extra step of altering hard drive controller drivers that wouldn't otherwise be necessary. A small price to pay versus losing all my data but it is annoying that windows can't just figure this out. –  Spencer Ruport Sep 27 '11 at 1:24
    
In a half-lucky situation like that, the 'quick-repair' procedure (as indicated by the George's) is the most efficient way. Hint: I'd give them the 'correct solution' tick :-) –  DutchUncle Sep 27 '11 at 7:29

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