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I have IIS 6 SMTP server running on 2003 box.

I am running a webserver (IIS) on the same system.

I want the SMTP server to deliver mail for my webserver.

I have it working fairly well - my only problem/confusion is getting a Reverse DNS record setup.

First, while this is all on the same machine, I believe it has been suggested that I use a separate IP address for the SMTP server. I am doing this and have set DNS to point smtp.mydomain.com to this IP. Good?

Now - I have to contact my ISP to have them make a Reverse DNS entry for my smtp server.

If the ip of smtp.mydomain.com is 1.2.3.4 - what is the proper request to make of my ISP?

Which (if any!) of the following do I want:

  • 4.3.2.1.in-addr.arpa ---> 1.2.3.4
  • 4.3.2.1.in-addr.arpa ---> smtp.mydomain.com
  • 4.3.2.1.in-addr.arpa ---> mydomain.com

Actually - would it be 4.3.2.1.in-addr.arpa.mydomain.com?

Anyway, this is the only mail server I plan to set up on this server - so send for one domain.

If I am way off - please correct!

Thanks!

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Oct 12 '11 at 1:53

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I wish I would have put this on ServerFault instead :( If I 'vote to delete' - will it actually delete? (If so, I would gladly post on ServerFault instead. If anyone has to power to remove it, go ahead...) –  Bill Gillingham Oct 11 '11 at 0:17

1 Answer 1

the second one:

  • 4.3.2.1.in-addr.arpa ---> smtp.mydomain.com

if it was 4.3.2.1.in-addr.arpa.mydomain.com, you wouldn't need your ISP to do it

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