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I believe there are 4 cables inside the UTP cable that are "active" for data, the rest might be for activity and other stuff. I need to know which colors represent the data transfer from an UTP ?

Or am I wrong ? Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here you go:

http://www.washington.edu/lst/help/computing_fundamentals/networking/schemes

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Perfect! What I wanted. –  Calavera Oct 14 '11 at 13:46
3  
@Elbow: Beware though that this site only covers network speeds up to 100MBit/s. For Gigabit Ethernet and upwards, all eight wires are used. –  Sven Oct 14 '11 at 14:08
    
Good point @SvenW –  Dan Oct 14 '11 at 14:10
    
It should also be noted that in gigE, the pairs don't actually matter that much. The devices that are built to spec should autonegotiate the pinout of each end. We just try to keep it following EIA/TIA 568 standards. –  Matthew Oct 14 '11 at 14:12
    
True enough but a good sys admin/it guy should really really enforce proper cabling practices. Some manufacturers don't have Auto MDI on by default and that leads to headaches. Personally i always cross then connecting Like devices and use straight through for unlike. –  ItsGC Oct 14 '11 at 15:23

This site hopefully will provide you with what you need! I belive for standard ethernet cable its pairs 1/2, 3/6, 4/5 and 7/8

http://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_lan.htm

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It's not black and white. For 10/100 its pairs 1/2 (transmit), and 3/6 (receive) - unless you're using equipment that can autonegotiate. For gigabit, all pairs are used. The above links are all also correct. I'm not sure about 10GigE.

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