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having an issue trying to segment my network.

Currently, our LAN resides on the 10.1.x.x segment, the first x varying based on qeuipment type, and the second varying on the number of the particular piece of equipment of that type.

What we would like to do is set up a wireless access point on the network, with an IP of 192.168.1.1, and a dhcp range of 2-100.

When trying to enter the default gateway and DNS settings on the access point, it tells me this can not be done as they are on a different network sefment.

We have previously managed to do this with a netgear router, but can't for the life of us remember how we did it.

The access point we are using is a TP-LINK TL-WA801ND. I've had a search around different places for an answer, but so far have been fairly uncsucessful.

Can any one point me in the right direction?

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3 Answers 3

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10.1.x.x segment, the first x varying based on qeuipment type

What a unique way to set up a subnet.

When trying to enter the default gateway and DNS settings on the access point, it tells me this can not be done as they are on a different network sefment.

I assume you mean that you've told it the default route is 10.1.y.z - that's not going to work (unless your netmask is 0.0.0.0 which will cause you all sorts of other problems).

We have previously managed to do this with a netgear router, but can't for the life of us remember how we did it.

I have no idea how this would have worked with IPv4 in this reality.

You need to set up the device as a router - configure the ethernet port on the device on the 10.1.x.x network (using the appropriate default gateway on that network). Enable routing, then specify the 192.168.x.x address of the AP as the default gateway in the config for the wireless DHCP server.

(a device which is only an AP will only bridge networds - which must have the same IP subnet - but this device can act as a router. But it'll probably implement NAT/masquerading by default)

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Hi bean, you are 100% correct, and I have just been informed that our old netgear was in fact a router and not an access point, and from that point onwards it clicked and I started thinking along the lines of what you have described. Thanks for your quick reply!! –  Eds Oct 26 '11 at 12:05

My first question to you - what's the subnet mask on the 10.1.x.x addresses? I've got to say - that's a somewhat unusual way of structuring your network.

Secondly, the default gateway has to be a router on the same subnet because that's what a router does: Moves traffic between networks / subnets.

If it's JUST an access point (I.e., not a router / AP combined) then you'll simply have to put a router in between. DNS can be on another network so you don't need to worry about that.

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You need to have that 192.168.1.0 network routed in your infrastructure and you need to connect the AP to it. You can't just magically create a network out of thin air with a Layer 2 device like an AP.

You were able to do this with your NetGear router, because that's a Layer 3 device that routes that subnet.

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