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My company recently bought an asset management appliance (a Dell Kace M300). The setup is supposed to be pretty painless; you essentially just attach an ethernet cable, power it on, and resolve a configuration page in your browser via IP (192.168.2.100).

The problem I'm experiencing is that I cannot resolve or even ping the IP of the device. We used to have a satellite office which we assigned a 192.168.2.X subnet to, which has since been closed. I demoted the satellite office's DC, removed the office AD site in Active Directory Sites and Services, reassigned the 192.168.2.X subnet to our headquarters AD site (this is where the asset management appliance is located), and forced replication on our domain controllers.

I'm not sure what my next step is. I figure I need to create a DNS record for the device but I don't know what the hostname of the appliance is and the PDFs of the documentation site appear to be corrupted. To be honest, I don't really think that's the root of my problem as I tried to setup a desktop on the recommissioned subnet with a static IP (making sure I created DNS records for it) and I couldn't get it to network. I kind of think I need a gateway for the 192.168.2.X subnet but I'm not sure how to do that or even if that's the right approach (perhaps I'm thinking too hard?).

Any thoughts on what I should do? Thanks in advance...

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1 Answer 1

The problem you're dealing with has nothing to do with Active Directory or DNS. You have a basic connectivity problem. The device has a default ip address of 192.168.2.100, so in order to connect to it you need to connect to it from a device on the same layer 3 network (subnet). My suggestion would be to connect a patch cable directly between the device and your workstation and assign your workstation an ip address of 192.168.2.101/24. This should give you connectivity to the device, which should then allow you to configure it as needed for your network.

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