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What is good substitute for windows server 2008 firewall with some Intrusion Prevention System Options?

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closed as not constructive by mailq, Iain, Shane Madden, Skyhawk, GregD Oct 29 '11 at 19:07

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Sure. A Cisco router in front of a Windows Server 2008. –  mailq Oct 29 '11 at 18:42
    
@mailq Normally I'd agree with you on the dupe, but the Server 2008 firewall is majorly different than the 2003 firewall that's discussed in many of those answers. –  MDMarra Oct 29 '11 at 18:45
    
@MarkM Ok, noted and removed. But I can't revoke the vote (technically). –  mailq Oct 29 '11 at 18:48
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Could you be specific about what you want? Why are you looking for a substitute? –  freiheit Oct 29 '11 at 18:56

1 Answer 1

Windows Firewall in Server 2008 and later does quite a bit more than application-specific rules. It does port-based rules, service-based rules, and it also can handle IP restrictions on any rules as well. It's quite robust, but still different than a typical hardware firewall or pf and netfiler. If you need something like a hardware firewall, use one on conjunction with your software firewall.

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I don't have problem with the windows firewall, I'd like to know if there is an alternative. –  Mat Banik Oct 29 '11 at 18:50
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@MatBanik Of course there are alternatives, many security companies sell them (Symantec, McAfee). Are they a good idea? No, probably not. Why would you want to replace a well-integrated and programmatically manageable piece of software with one that's less integrated and has the same functionality? Unless you have a specific need to replace the Windows Firewall, there's no good reason to. –  MDMarra Oct 29 '11 at 18:53

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