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I have a small VPS, without control panel, I will use it to host a single website. I want to setup DNS server for just this website on the server.

I read couple of tutorials but it never worked for me. They are all complex and talks about many details which I don't need.

I use centos5 with BIND. Is there any simple tutorial (or script!) which do this?

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Unless you are just wanting to learn to manage bind, I suggest you use your domain providers or 3rd party DNS. Running your own DNS server for 1 domain is a bit of an overkill. –  jeffatrackaid Dec 12 '11 at 19:43
    
Also search google for setting up bind on CentOS 5. Plenty of tutorials are there. –  jeffatrackaid Dec 12 '11 at 19:43
    
I agree with jeffatrackaid very much. Just get nameserver service from the company you bought your domain from. This generally does not cost anything and would be much more reliable than managing it on your own. This is the setup I use as well. –  Can Kavaklıoğlu Dec 12 '11 at 19:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For only one domain on a small web infrastructure, you should really look into your provider DNS system.

However, if you really want to build the system by yourself and maintain it, look into DNSMASQ. This is WAY easier to 'configure and forget' than BIND will ever be for non-sysadmin.

While it is not made for 'public use', it will be able to withstand quite a bit of beating before folding. System is easy enough: you create a file with IP DNS-NAME combo (as seen in /etc/hosts) and you start dnsmasq.

If you are on CentOS, don't forget to open your firewall for it to work.

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Here is CentOS's BIND documentation: http://www.centos.org/docs/5/html/Deployment_Guide-en-US/ch-bind.html

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