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I am new to ISA server and here is my requirements, and I want to use ISA server to setup reverse proxy to achieve my requirements. I have two questions,

  1. Whether ISA server could serve my needs?
  2. Could anyone recommend me a tutorial about ISA server reverse proxy setup?

My environment is, IIS + Windows Server 2003/2008 + .Net. I have several web sites, each of them has stable and beta version, for example, I have beta version order system and stable version order system, the same as purchase system. I deployed the 4 systems on 4 different physical machines.

My requirement is, I want to have a common URL schema to access the different systems, like,

http://www.mycorp.com/order/beta
http://www.mycorp.com/order/stable
http://www.mycorp.com/purchase/beta
http://www.mycorp.com/purchase/stable

But since the 4 systems are deployed on 4 different physical machines with different machine/DNS name, how could I map the same domain (http://www.mycorp.com) with different suffix to different physical online systems using ISA reverse proxy?

thanks in advance, George

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should be able to do that using different subfolders in your web publishing rules.

This Microsoft TechNet article explains the details and has some walk-throughs for ISA Server 2004:

Web publishing provides you detailed control over access to content. Web publishing rules are rich in features, including the following:

  • Mapping requests to specific internal paths. You can limit the portions of your servers that can be accessed.
  • Restricting access to specific users, computers, or networks. You can restrict access, to further improve security.
  • Requiring user authentication. User authentication can be passed through to the Web server, eliminating the need to reauthenticate at the Web server.
  • Providing link translation. You can handle links to internal servers.
  • Providing SSL bridging. You can encrypt traffic between the ISA Server computer and the Web server.

Search for this section:

Publishing Web server folders on the Internal or perimeter network to one domain name

You can publish specific folders on a Web server on the Internal network or on a perimeter network. In this scenario, both folders are published to the same domain. For example, you want to publish the \news folder to www.fabrikam.com/news, and the \updates folder to www.fabrikam.com/updates.


For ISA Server 2006 there is this article (or as Word file here), which explains the options you have for publishing. Search for "Web Publishing Rule Properties" and "Path Mapping" inside the document.

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@splattne, the document is very nice! Two more comments, 1. the document is for ISA Server 2004, are there any documents for ISA 2006? I think ISA Server 2006 should be the most recent version of ISA server? 2. In my current solution, clients will access individual different physical servers, but in the solution of ISA web site publishing, all clients will access a single point of server -- the ISA server, the ISA server will redirect the request. Will the ISA server in this scenario be the single point of performance bottleneck? –  George2 Jul 1 '09 at 13:45
    
@splattne, I read the document and from the description seem as you said, Path Mapping is just what I want. But there is not detailed steps about how to do Path Mapping step by step. Any recommended document about step by step Path Mapping? –  George2 Jul 2 '09 at 9:04
    
Thanks,splattne! My question is answered. I have a related question which deals with detailed settings when I map internal server to external server, appreciated if you could help to review here, serverfault.com/questions/35043/… –  George2 Jul 2 '09 at 14:42
    
Okay. I answered the question there. Feel free to comment that answer. –  splattne Jul 2 '09 at 15:33

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