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I have a Windows shared folder that contains a two level hierarchy. The permissions are managed by security groups. The interesting permissions are set in the second level. A first level folder should only be visible if the user can see access any second level folder. I would like to simplify management of the first level by "reverse inheriting" permissions. Moreover no one expect the Admins should be capable to do any change on the first level including the second level folders.

The setup

Windows Server 2008 R2 in Domain

Hierarchy:

  • Project A (group-a-all, read on directory only)
    • Team A1 (group-a1, full permission)
      • Files
    • Team A2 (group-a2, full permission)
      • Files
  • Project B (group-b-all, read on directory only)
    • Team B1 (group-b1, full permission)
      • Files
    • Team A2 (group-a2, full permission)
      • Files
  • [Fixer (group-a1)]

The groups group-a1 and group-a2 are members of group-a-all. The accessing user is member of group-a1 for example. To prevent changes or deleting on the second level I defined in addition that the group-a1 cannot change or delete on the specific folder.

The effect

The user is member of group-a1. She sees the Project A folder. But not the Team A1. Not until I created some Fixer folder with permissions containing group-a1. This works even if the permission is outside the Project A tee. So it seems that the second level permissions do only work if these permissions (AD Security Groups) have been used in the first level.

Why is this so? Is there a better way to handle this scenario?

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It seems as if I restricted too much on the second level. Now I only prevent per folder the altering of attributes, deletion, permission change and ownership change. Now the second level folders become visible without the Fixer. Still the setup seem unnecessary complicated. –  Roman Jan 8 '12 at 4:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Maybe:

Hierarchy:

    Team A1 (group-a1, full permission)
        Files

Project A (group-a-all, read on directory only) Shared folder Team A2 (group-a2, full permission) Files

    Team B1 (group-b1, full permission)
        Files

Project B (group-b-all, read on directory only) Shared folder Team A2 (group-a2, full permission) Files [Fixer (group-a1)]

So Team A1 would share all files if they are in that team(group) and share the Project A folder, but only have read permissions

Otherwise if you have sub folders under Project A with 2 groups, it's a little bit more to manage.

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