Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I guess this would be the appropriate place to ask this sort of question. At university, our IT staff has set up network profiles, where you can use the same login credentials to gain access to any school-run computer terminal. The school supports both Windows and Mac OS, so we can use the same credentials for each.

At work, my bosses would like to set up something similar, where each desktop there can be accessed using the same login credentials. They use all Apple iMac computers, with a small development server in-house which runs Arch Linux.

My question is this: is there a guide out there or some easy way to set up network profile sharing or single sign-on capabilities? It would be nice to use anyone's computer to get the job done, or if we have guests to allow them to login and allow them to get their work done. Thank you for any and all answers!

share|improve this question

migrated from security.stackexchange.com Jan 16 '12 at 21:26

This question came from our site for Information security professionals.

    
Actually, the appropriate place to ask would be Server Fault. But, this was a nice start. I'm flagging it for migration (please don't cross-post). –  Iszi Jan 16 '12 at 17:30
    
Ah, whoops! Thanks for the heads up, I'll be sure to ask there next time. –  Zach Dziura Jan 16 '12 at 20:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is not going to be trivial. You need to set up a directory service (e.g. Active Directory, Open Directory, eDirectory etc.) to centrally store the identities, then you configure the clients to authenticate against this. But like I said it's not trivial, it requires a lot of planning and maintenance.

Have a look at any one of the links returned from this quick search to give you an idea of what's involved.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh dear. Well, I guess that's why they pay me the big bucks to solve these problems. Thanks a bunch! –  Zach Dziura Mar 14 '12 at 4:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.