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I'm running Ubuntu server on a computer used as a wireless AP, but this AP should resolve all DNS requests to an internal IP address rather than actually performing the lookup.

I want to do the same thing that paid public WiFi hotspots do - you can connect but if you attempt to load any websites they show a default page. I've noticed that they do this by resolving all domains to an internal IP address.

I've added these lines to /etc/dnsmasq.conf:

# Add domains which you want to force to an IP address here.
# The example below send any host in double-click.net to a local
# web-server.
address=/com/192.168.2.1
address=/uk/192.168.2.1
address=/org/192.168.2.1
address=/gov/192.168.2.1
address=/net/192.168.2.1
address=/us/192.168.2.1

which works fine for those TLD's, but I'd like to be able to do it with all domains so I can sleep at night.

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2  
why not just use a captive portal like sputnik or the like? How do you plan to change DNS after they login? –  Paul Ackerman Jan 18 '12 at 16:33
    
Trying to achieve this? If you edit your dhcpd and then do iptables -A PREROUTING -s 192.168.0.0/255.255.255.0 -p tcp -j DNAT --to-destination 192.168.2.1 –  user Jan 18 '12 at 16:40
    
@PaulAckerman I used public WiFi as an example. This AP will never allow real DNS requests to be made. I'll try the iptables thing. –  Matt Jan 18 '12 at 17:18
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1 Answer

up vote 10 down vote accepted

As the dnsmasq manual says …

… just use # for a wildcard:

address=/#/192.168.2.1

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1  
rtfm indeed but god bless you anyway :D –  Pitto May 10 '13 at 13:41
    
Which manual? 'man dnsmasq' gives me a BOAT LOAD of command line options, but almost no information on config file layout. –  Avian00 Jun 11 '13 at 11:31
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