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Got a major issue that I need some help with. Here is the situation.

The client has multiple web sites hosted on multiple web servers (virtual machines) running on multiple virtual hosts that connect to a backend domain that have multiple SQL clusters (active / passive) for the multiple websites. (to clarify, the web sites each connect to a separate database cluster, they have 3 clusters)

What we would like to do is setup the SQL database servers to be able to serve the data for multiple website servers in multiple locations and having the SQL servers be in high availability. The data needs to be the same across the board.

They want their DRP site to now be a live extension of the production environment essentially making two live environments with web servers on virtual hosts in both locations and SQL clusters in both locations and the data cannot be different as the web users will be load balanced across both.

My question is what is the best way to setup the SQL servers across these two location?

Thanks in advance.

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So you essentially want two or more SQL databases that are in sync with each other, each of which you can read and write to? Sounds like peer-to-peer replication to me. –  Ben Thul Feb 2 '12 at 22:26

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Currently only replication allows you to have the functionality of readable/writeable copies of the same database in multiple locations, although if the remote location can be readable only then you could look at a log shipping configuration to solve that problem.

In SQL 2012 there is a new feature called AlwaysOn that will allow you to have cluster nodes in separate locations without SAN replication or a bridged subnet.

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