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Currently using Spiceworks to get an inventory of workstations/applications of an 'inherited' network. I see a lot of 'unwanted' software on PCs and am wanting to uninstall this software, such as : Dealio, Coupon Printer, Ask toolbar, Weatherbug etc.

I have tried many things to uninstall this software including:

  • Psexec stand alone (psexec.exe with and without -i, -s, user credentials specified or not)
  • WMI stand alone
  • This batch script from spiceworks
  • This HTA VBscript from spiceworks
  • ManagePC

None of these methods work to uninstall the offending software. I have tested each of these methods against software on my local machine, and the only one that actually gets an uninstaller even going is the HTA. However, I don't have any of the unwanted software installed on MY computer to test the HTA uninstall method with. Attempting it on the offending PCs, gives me feedback of 'Software is being uninstalled' but it in fact, never is actually uninstalled.

Question: Short of going to each PC individually and uninstalling the offending software, what method or program would allow me to remotely uninstall unwanted software from domain workstations?

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How many workstations? Save yourself the time sink this may become. The time spent on developing the various specific uninstallation scripts may likely be better spent [re]building your imaging/software deployment. Then just reimage them, remove local admin privileges for end-users and be done with it. –  jscott Feb 21 '12 at 22:34
    
@Jscott 495 workstations with varying degree of hardware profiles and required applications (Base applications + dept specific applications). Nearly impossible to pre-image and deploy a standard clone using WDS/Clonezilla/Acronis. Currently 15 of those workstations are already upgraded to Win 7, but the rest are XP. –  PenguinCoder Feb 21 '12 at 23:26
    
Your standard clone should only contain the OS and apps common for all machines (MS Office, Java, Flash, etc.) department specific apps can be deployed via Group Policy, scripting or the like. "Cleaning" workstations can be a losing battle. With my 4000 clients, it's impossible. Best of luck. –  jscott Feb 21 '12 at 23:50
    
@jscott Can you combine your comments and make them an answer, so I can accept it? Research and planning has shown that re-imaging PCs from a singular base point is the best course of action. –  PenguinCoder May 8 '12 at 15:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Question has been inactive for quite a while with no responses.

Quoting Jscotts' comment from above as the answer since he did not respond to do so:

Your standard clone should only contain the OS and apps common for all machines (MS Office, Java, Flash, etc.) department specific apps can be deployed via Group Policy, scripting or the like. "Cleaning" workstations can be a losing battle.

Attempting to post-clean users' PC is nigh on impossible at worst, and at best a never ending headache. Replacing the entire OS and going with proper installed applications and user security is the best course of action.

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