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Where does an ubuntu machine get the default domain to append to users when sending mail? Ours is currently sending as user@example.com, while /etc/mailname has mail.example.com set. Should this not be sending as user@mail.example.com? I'm using exim4, and I've dpkg-reconfigure'd it so that the system mail name, and the visible domain name are both set to mail.example.com.

--edited to include mailserver--

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What mail server are you using? –  Bill Weiss Jul 6 '09 at 20:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the default configuration on an Ubuntu / Debian box, the contents of /etc/mailname is used. It can, of course, be overridden in the actual config file for exim, postfix, etc.

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D'oh, sorry. Just noticed that you specifically referenced /etc/mailname. –  Insyte Jul 6 '09 at 21:19
    
my /etc/mailname says mail.example.com, and I've dpkg-reconfigure'd exim4-config, so that the system mail name, and visible domain name are both set to mail.example.com. But my email is still showing up as coming from user@example.com. Anywhere else it could be set? –  Cian Jul 6 '09 at 21:27
    
Well, there's the possible solution mentioned in this bug report: bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/exim4/+bug/49776 Unfortunately, I'm not that familiar with exim, so I can't be much use other than to say: I just did a fresh install of exim4 on an Ubuntu 8.04 box and /etc/mailname was used appropriately. –  Insyte Jul 6 '09 at 22:12
    
(After a dpkg-reconfigure exim4-config, of course.) –  Insyte Jul 6 '09 at 22:13
    
After checking this again, it appears mutt reads /etc/mailname, minus everything before the first . Exim itself reads /etc/mailname itself. –  Cian Sep 20 '09 at 1:14

Most mail servers will chop off the first part of the mail server name (i.e. pop, pop3, smtp, imap, mail) to get what it should put after the @ sign in the email address.

Without knowing the email server you are using, it is hard to give a recommendation on how to change this. I assume a form of Linux, but you should really give more detail.

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It appears this is correct. It seems to read /etc/mailname, and then chop off everything up to the first dot to get the domain for users mail addresses. –  Cian Jul 6 '09 at 22:12

Just to be on the safe side - you haven't accidentally set a mail address for the user in /etc/email-addresses?

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Nope. Don't have any such file. –  Cian Jul 6 '09 at 22:07

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