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According to this wiki article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZFS

there are a number of zpool implementations out there. For example, OpenSolaris and derivatives are at 28. While FreeBSD 8 appears to be at version 15. Solaris 11 is at 33 etc.

The table in that article also lists some distributions are missing some features.

What is the difference between these zpool versions? is it features or are there other fundamental differences such as increased performance on newer versions?

What I'm particularly interested in are hybrid storage pools. Does FreeNAS 8 (A FreeBSD 8 based NAS? with zpool 15) support hybrid storage?

I'd love to see features matrix or something that summarizes ZFS versions. Does such a beast exist?

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NOTE: The version system mentioned here is no longer used by open source implementations. A new "flag" system has replaced the old system - where flags indicate feature support, the older system only allowed sequential support of features tied to version numbers. –  Chris S yesterday

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZFS#Detailed_release_history

That's the nicest list I've seen to date of the differences.

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Exactly what I was after. Strange, I didn't see the wiki zfs article before. –  Matt Mar 6 '12 at 4:26

Have you looked at http://hub.opensolaris.org/bin/view/Community+Group+zfs/1? It's a little low level, but that's the only difference between versions sometimes.

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Thanks, hadn't seen that. I'll wait for a bit and see if there is a spreadsheet or table based answer. If not, looks like this could be it! –  Matt Mar 6 '12 at 1:49

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