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I have a dedicated server from 1and1.

Let's say I have a domain named example.com. Can I point it at ns1.example.com and ns2.example.com and use it for other domains?

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Note that if you don't register glue records with your registrar, this will form an unresolvable loop. "How do I find the name server for example.com?" "Ask ns1.example.com or ns2.example.com." "Okay, how do I find the IP address for those so I can ask them?" "Ask the nameserver for example.com." "That's what I wanted to know in the first place!" –  David Schwartz Mar 18 '12 at 5:39
    
@DavidSchwartz; I did this before you write it. I went my registar. Create 2 ns with my domain and point it to the IP of my dedicated. If you write it as an answer I could choose as accepted. –  borayeris Mar 19 '12 at 17:29

4 Answers 4

Yes, but unless you've got another, geographically diverse, server to host the second nameserver, you shouldn't. There are whole RFCs (ie RFC2182) on how DNS should be run; I'd suggest reading them before you embark on this adventure.

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Depending on how you host your DNS, you may be opening yourself to DNS cache poisoning, or leaking information you don't want to share (think Active Directory).

I would advise against hosting your own DNS; since you are increasing your surface area of a DOS. Your ISP is probably (hopefully) better than you are at this.

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Depending on the situation, you may want to consider a setup similar to this other question.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I logged in my registar and created 2 ns with my domain and point it to the IP of my dedicated. Now it works.

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