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I was wondering if anyone could shed light into "Guest optimization tips for Ubuntu (guest)"

I came across http://serverfault.com/questions/18290/virtual-machine-guest-optimization-tips, for Windows. (serverfault.com/questions/4647/ubuntu-inside-virtualbox-is-slow) is close enough, but not quite like the earlier question.

One thing I overlooked was installing additional drivers for guest. The VM felt much 'refined' after installing the addons. I am obsessed by the thought that the guest and the host are going to fight out a memory battle. I plan to use eclipse/netbeans on Ubuntu with frequent switching to Vista.

Anyone with their experiences? Any Guest optimization tips for Ubuntu as a guest?

PS: the second hyperlink is not linked due to the curse of "a new user".

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closed as off topic by MDMarra, sysadmin1138 Aug 14 '11 at 20:21

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What operating system do you have the Virtual Box hypervisor installed in? –  dezwart Jul 9 '09 at 7:55

3 Answers 3

Ubuntu's got a kernel meant explicitly for running in virtual machines; you might want to take a look at that. The package is called linux-virtual.

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A very basic, but in my opinion often forgot, tip is to simple uninstall all the programs not needed - even the X graphical user interface (if you don't depend on it).

Like already mentioned: using the VM optimized kernel will normally give you a huge performance boost and is most of the times recommended.

If you need your VM for some special tasks only, try thinking about a window manager switch. Moving from Gnome to a more lightweight and ressource-friendly WM like XFCE, Fluxbox, etc. can lower the memory usage, too.

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If you using Ubuntu, try JEOS. A few tips in my earlier post here.

http://serverfault.com/questions/40086/which-linux-distribution-runs-smoothly-in-suns-virtualbox

Most tips for a linux audio workstation and linux on older hardware are applicable to virtuals.

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