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We recently upgraded our primary Domain Controller. The new DC is a new box with Windows Server 2008 R2, the old one was Windows Server 2003.

We did a full migration of domain accounts to the new server, and it is synced with the other DCs across the country (various 2003 or 2008 boxes).

Since this time, we've replaced a few workstations and created a few new users with new stations(all Windows 7 Pro). One user, whenever he attempts to log in with his domain account onto the desktop, gets the error "The security database on the server does not have a computer account for this workstation trust relationship." 15 minutes later he can try again and log in with no problem.

Checking the list of computers in all DCs, his does not appear. We removed the computer from the domain and back into a workgroup, re-added, and it still happens. Removing the computer, renaming it, and re-adding it also doesn't work.

Both times the computer successfully joins the domain, but won't appear in the list of computers. What can I do to fix this?

Update: As shown in the comments, the issue is with replication across the DCs. This is only affecting the one computer, however, as others have been added to the domain with no problems. The DC it joins is not the main, backup main, or one associated with its 'site.' What could cause replication issues of a single computer?

Update 2: It turns out a few other issues have been found with replication, so my little problem will hopefully be fixed along with the other problems, though the details of the solution are out of my hands now.

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Have you deleted and recreated the user account as well? Also, is the 2003 DC still on the network? –  JohnThePro Apr 20 '12 at 16:32
    
No to both. The user has a secondary laptop that is used, and I'm unsure what would happen to his exchange mailbox. The 2003 DC is no longer on the network, but is still in the domain. Official demotion is planned for next week. –  Lenny Apr 20 '12 at 16:39
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As a note, you should demote the machines BEFORE you remove them from the network. Otherwise you can deal with metadata being left over, and make more work for yourself. For the laptop, you'd have to make sure its inside the network so you could give him the new username (since you're using Exchange, as long as the mailbox and the user are linked, you're fine) –  JohnThePro Apr 20 '12 at 16:42
    
On the Win7 machine in question, is it pointed at the new DC for DNS? –  JohnThePro Apr 20 '12 at 16:42
    
Yes, the Win7 desktop points to the new DC for DNS. –  Lenny Apr 20 '12 at 16:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on what I've read, I would do the following:

Check all DCs for the NetLogon share - When there are replication issues, that's usually a tell-tale sign.

Assuming you find a DC that does not have the NETLOGON share, follow the instructions in Using the BurFlags registry key to reinitialize File Replication Service replica sets

Run DCDIAG on all DCs (I use DCDIAG /C /E /V). Address and resolve any unexplained issues. (I usually recommend this BEFORE adding any DCs)

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I dont see it anywhere above, have you tried to remove the machine from the domain, create the computer object manually in AD and then join again? We've had that fix a few of the issues encountered from migrating DCs 2003 to 2008.

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