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Something similar to nt domain controller in linux?

ex. two hosts with one shared authentication.

how to ?

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closed as not constructive by Wesley, Murali Suriar, jscott, Greg Askew, Ward Apr 27 '12 at 23:51

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3 Answers 3

There's NIS.
There's LDAP (pam_ldap, nss-pam-ldapd - this can auth against AD too!).
There's various flavors of Kerberos (though I've always found setup annoying).
There's Samba (for authenticating to Windows/AD directly).
There's a bunch of other options.

Pick one, and google for a howto. There are plenty out there.

There's also doing some research before you ask a question (which is why I downvoted this question).

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Is Google broken??

LDAP is what you're after... on Linux I'll believe you'll use OpenLDAP. There is plenty of material available for setting this on a number of different distributions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightweight_Directory_Access_Protocol

All the information you need is there, and in the documentation for the various different Linux distrbutions.

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Use Active Directory/LDAP for that. Basic google search for active directory integration with linux will shield lot of results. Here is a basic guide: http://rjalan.blogspot.com/2008/03/ubuntu-710-server-and-active-directory.html

LDAP/NIS would also work.

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